Module 4 – Chapter 2

Lettering designs

The purpose of this chapter was to explore different styles of lettering, and the patterns that can be made with them.

I started by choosing a word, “writing”, and representing it with different drawing tools and different ‘styles’ of lettering.  These are shown below.

image Image 2.1:  ink on telephone directory applied with pipette and paint brush

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Image 2.3:  ink on envelope packet applied with bamboo dip pen and twig

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Image 2.3 – bamboo dip pen made fresh from the garden!

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Image 2.4 – ink on envelope lining applied with various calligraphy nibs

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Image 2.5 – ink applied with spatula, end of paint brush, edge of credit card and end of paper clip

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Image 2.6 – ink applied with edge of card

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Image 2.7 – ink applied with rubber

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Image 2.8 – ink applied with end of coiled card

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Image 2.9 – ink applied with edge of card

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Image 2.10 – ink applied with toothed card and edge of card

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Image 2.11 – ink applied with edge of credit card

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Image 2.12 – telephone directory page covered in Quink.  Bleach applied with bamboo pen, end of paper clip, credit card edge

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Image 2.13 – page covered in Quink.  Bleach applied with toothed card and edge of card

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Image 2.14 – Quink applied with edge of card and bleach applied on top with bamboo pen

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Image 2.15– page covered in Quink  and placed over metal mesh.  Oil pastel used to writ so that rubbing of the mesh showed through.

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Image 2.16 – PVA glue squeezed from a snipped corner of a bag and allowed to dry.  When dry it was coated with walnut ink.

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Image 2.17 – PVA glue squeezed from a snipped corner of a bag and whilst wet, ink was dragged through the lettering.  When dry the page was flooded with water and ink was dripped on to it.

 image Image 2.18 – various coloured felt tip pens, different sizes writing in horizontal and vertical lines.

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Image 2.18 – blue felt tip pens, same size writing in horizontal, diagonal and vertical lines.

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Image 2.19 – large writing in oil pastel, then painted over with Quink so that the pastel acted as a resist, then writing on top in oil pastel.

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Image 2.20 – page covered in Quink, then writing in bleach, then writing in 8B pencil and ink with bamboo pen.

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Image 2.21 – writing in blue and black ink using toothed card, then gold lettering on top

image Image 2.22 – page covered in Quink, then writing in bleach using an twig and oil pastel rubbed over the top

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Images 2.23 and 2.24 – felt tip with various sizes of lettering.  2.24 is the same image with doodling added.

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Image 2.25 and 2.26– writing applied with pipette then dragged with the edge of a card, then silver pen on top.  Image 2.26 is the same image with doodling added

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Image 2.27 and 2.28 – writing applied with pipette then orange dye paint was added and allowed to bleed into the ink.  Image 2.28 is the same image with doodling added

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Image 2.29 and 2.30– writing applied with a hot glue gun and allowed to dry.  Quink applied on top and then oil pastel rubbed over it.  Image 2.30 is the same image with doodling in bleach added.

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Image 2.31 – strips of envelope lining glued to the page and rows of lettering in various felt tip colours added to create bands.

Images 2.32 – 2.35 below were all created by rubbing oil pastels over the hot glue lettering (2.29) and then added diluted ink over the top.

image Image 2.32 – rubbed once in one direction and then at 90 degrees to the first rubbing

image Image 2.33 –rubbed in various directions overlapping

image Image 2.34 – three rows in different coloured pastels

image Image 2.35 – alternate rows – one row the right way up and the next upside down.

Creating patterns from lettering on a computer

I started by creating a block of text using the Paint function in Microsoft Office.  I wrote ‘writing’ once and then copied and pasted it several times to create the block shown in image 2.36

image Image 2.36 – starting text block

I then altered it by selecting sections to cut, copy and paste in different positions.  I also rotated, enlarged or reduced the copied sections.  The images below show the various stages of transforming the original block.

imageImage 2.37

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Image 2.38

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Image 2.39

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Image 2.40

imageImage 2.41 – the final abstract pattern

I am very pleased with this final result.  Whilst it isn’t obvious that it has been created from lettering, it certainly suggests text in certain places.  The sections where the text has been reduced seem to give an impression of Islamic lettering.

Images 2.42 – below show another series using a similar process.  In this series I created an abstract block as shown in image and then wrote ‘writing’ on top of it and then manipulated it further.

image Image 2.42 – starting text block

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Image 2.43

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Image 2.44

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Image 2.45 – abstract pattern with lettering added on top

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Image 2.46

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Image 2.47 – the final abstract pattern

I have really enjoyed this chapter and am pleased with the variety of lettering styles that I have produced.  Having enjoyed the messy part, using inks and different drawing implements I was not looking forward to the computer drawing.  However, I am now a convert…I am very impressed with the abstract patterns that I created in this section. 

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Module 4 – Chapter 1

The starting point for this module is to collect items relating to media, and arrange a collection of items or representations of the items in a sketchbook.

I collected a range of items such as envelopes, postage labels, windows from envelopes, linings from envelopes, bubble wrap, brown paper, postage stamps, telephone directory pages, bar codes, string, and paper clips.  I arranged these as a collage in my sketchbook.  See images 1.1 – 1.3 below.

imageImage 1.1.

image Image 1.2

image Image 1.3 

This is a work in progress and I will probably re-photograph this page towards the end of the module as I am adding pieces to the collage as I find them.

The colour scheme for this Module suggested by these items is mainly shades of blues and brown with some shots of bright colours such as red and orange from the stamps.

Items of stationery

I was asked to find images of structures which I can consider making as my final embroidered piece for this module. The structures should have a simple shape with a large flat area suitable for an embroidered surface.

I would like my final piece to be something that I will use frequently and so considered the following:

image Image 1.4 – Kindle cover

imageImage 1.5 – lap top computer case

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Image 1.6 – sketchbook cover

Lettering research

I collected examples of different types and styles of lettering from magazines and newspapers  as shown below. The lettering includes different fonts and styles of writing.  I was very attracted to different alphabets.  I included Russian, Chinese, Japanese and Arabic writing as the shapes of the lettering are very attractive and, because one isn’t distracted by the content, the shapes become more important.

imageImage 1.7

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Image 1.8

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Image 1.9 

These are also works in progress and I will re-photograph towards the end of the module as I am adding pieces to the page as I find them.